Travel & Transportation

lifelaidout Q1 '17 Update

lifelaidout Q1 '17 Update

I hope your 2017 has been off to a good start! On the east coast, it seems like we're finally making way for warmer weather (fingers crossed). 

At lifelaidout, we've been working hard to help people reach their financial goals through comprehensive planning as well as educating people about personal financial strategies through articles, talks, and media mentions

See below for a summary of what we've been up to. If you would like to explore working together, through individualized planning or a company/group talk, please email me at roger@lifelaidout.com to start the process. 

Never Overpay When Traveling Internationally Again

Never Overpay When Traveling Internationally Again

Traveling internationally has always been a favorite hobby. It's a great way to learn about new cultures, try new foods (and wines), and get a taste of history. I've savored limoncello while overlooking the beautiful Amalfi Coast; I've toured the streets of Cuba on a scooter; and I've walked over thousands of years of history in Jerusalem's Old City. 

Unfortunately, the high cost of airline tickets and hotels has restricted me to about one trip annually. However, over the years, I've been able to figure out a couple of tricks that have saved me a significant amount of time and money when traveling abroad. I've outlined three of my top tips below.

Cost of Owning a Car in NYC

Cost of Owning a Car in NYC

Over the last month, I've rented a car twice - the first time to do some light moving and the second time to take a trip to Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Each time I've been pretty surprised by how much it actually costs to rent a car. For four hours on a Sunday, it cost me $53 to rent a standard 4-door sedan and for a whole Saturday, it was $160. Naturally, I started thinking about if it was somehow more cost effective to own a car in the city rather than rent. 

What Rental Car Insurance Do You Really Need?

What Rental Car Insurance Do You Really Need?

I rented a car a couple of weeks ago and thought I had scored a great deal at $150 for three days. When I got to the counter and was asked whether I needed any insurance, I froze like a deer in headlights.

I knew my credit card had some insurance coverage, but I couldn't remember exactly what it covered. As a result, I ended up opting for two pieces of insurance that, in the end, were unnecessary and increased my bill to $225.

That got me thinking: What type of coverage do you really need when renting a car?